Factors That May Affect Child Custody Decisions

May 16

Factors That May Affect Child Custody Decisions

Divorce is a life-altering experience, especially because it is not just about you and your partner, as it is also about your children. One common area of dispute in divorce is child custody. According to the website of these San Antonio child custody attorneys, child custody arrangements can also occur during parental deaths, parental incompetence, and a variety of other situations. But they all have one thing in common – it seeks the best interest of the child.

Each parent’s financial standing

Since child custody is always about the best interest of the child, it is not surprising that courts will favor those who can provide more, in terms of food, shelter, security, education, health, and other aspects that concern the child’s development.

Each parent’s bond with the child

Child custody is not always about financial support, as it may also be about emotional support. The parent-child relationship comes to mind. Factors that may affect this relationship, such as feeding the child, taking the child to school, and being a stay-at-home spouse to take care of the child, can influence court decisions.

Both parents’ willingness to cooperate

Court decisions can be favorable to both father and mother if they show that they are willing to be co-parents despite their separation. The arrangements may not be entirely equal, but it may be close and there will be no hard feelings between the spouses.

History of abuse, neglect, and crime

To further know if a parent is still beneficial for a child, the court investigates allegations and actual cases of abuse and neglect, such as domestic violence. Criminal records can also be factors, especially if the offenses are felonies. These things are considered to know if a parent is mentally sound to be with a child.

The child’s choice

Of course, the court will also ask about the child’s preference, whether he wants to go with his father or mother. The preference is not absolute, but it will be considered. The absolute factor in child custody is still the best interest of the child.

Read More